Art Deco Rare Dining Suites and Lounge Suites

Elegant and iconic, original Art Deco “Cloud” dining suites to seat 8 and to seat 6 people in walnut and maple have arrived into the gallery and the warehouse, along with a scroll-back 6 seater dining suite and rare “Cloud” lounge suites. Please visit The Design Gallery or call us to make an appointment to visit the Furniture Warehouse in Edenbridge on 01959 56123. Cocktail cabinets and sideboards are also available.

Waring and Gillows

Gillow’s of Lancaster can be traced back to the luxury furniture and furnishings firm founded by Robert Gillow in 1730.During the 1730s he began to exploit the lucrative West Indies trade exporting mahogany furniture and importing rum and sugar. Following his death in 1772, the business was continued by his two sons, Richard and Robert. In 1764 a London branch of Gillow’s was established at what is now Oxford Street, by Thomas Gillow and William Taylor.

 

After suffering financial difficulties at the end of the 19th century the company began a loose arrangement with Waring of Liverpool, an arrangement legally ratified by the establishment of Waring & Gillow in 1903.

Waring’s of Liverpool was founded in 1835 by John Waring,  Belfast in 1835 and established a wholesale cabinet making business. He was succeeded by his son Samuel James Waring who quickly expanded the  wholesale cabinet making business. Throughout the 1880’s the company was known for furnishing hotels and public buildings throughout Europe. Samuel also founded Waring-White Building Company which built the Liverpool Corn Exchange, Selfridge’s department store and the Ritz Hotel.

 

 

 

 

 

Epstein Brothers

The quality of the furniture produced by the Epstein brothers of London’s East End is widely recognised as among the finest in the British Art Deco style – in terms of both design and production.

Sons of Morris Epstein, a Russian immigrant cabinet maker, and born in the early years of the new twentieth century, all six brothers followed their father into the furniture trade. Morris (also known as Solomon) retired in 1929 and his young sons, most notably Harry and Louis (Lou), went on to design and produce some of the most innovative furniture of the period.

Their style reflected the avant-garde influences of the Paris 1925 ‘Art Deco’ exhibition, seen in their use of curvilinear forms and rich veneers. These traits blended, almost unconsciously, with a certain grandeur and scale that derived from their family’s Russian background, and found expression in designs that were also in tune with the Modernist ethos emanating from continental Europe. The styling of the iconic ‘Cloud’ dining, lounge and salon suites, for instance, conveyed that sense of sunshine, fresh air and exercise that was promoted as the key to a healthy mind and body, and as an antidote to any lingering shadows of the horrors of the First World War.

Furniture in this ‘Art Deco’ style was produced, alongside the Georgian reproduction pieces that Morris Epstein had excelled in, from the 1930s until at least the 1950s. Finished to high standards, many pieces were custom-made in veneers of burr maple, sycamore or walnut. After World War II, several of the Epstein brothers, including Harry & Lou, David and Michael, and Sidney had showrooms in London, Manchester and Glasgow. A conservative, and singularly British, Art Deco style became the Epstein trademark.

During the Art Deco period the Epstein brothers traded under a variety of business names, both individually and in partnership with one or other of their brothers.  Art Deco pieces from before World War II were not signed. From the 1950s, some pieces were labelled ‘H. & L. Epstein Ltd’ or ‘Epstein & Goldman’. However, over the last decade a scholarly and painstaking approach to a variety of documentary and other sources has enabled a good number of Epstein designs to be identified with confidence.

August 2017